Sir Mix-A-Lot Spoke On The Blake Lively Butt Pic, And What, You Thought He Wouldn’t Be Down With An Ass Like That?

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Sir Mix-A-Lot Spoke On The Blake Lively Butt Pic, And What, You Thought He Wouldn’t Be Down With An Ass Like That?

Blake Lively created a minor cultural appropriation controversy when she posted a picture of her ass to Instagram with a caption from Sir Mix-A-Lot’s famous ode to all things booty. It was … inane at best? Should a white girl be allowed to post a picture of her ass with a quote from a song that was intended to glorify African American woman? Ummmm… I guess not, but maybe like it’s not the biggest deal because it’s a picture on Instagram? Anyway, there was of course a media maelstrom, because we never have anything better to do. It became the top trending story on Facebook, garnering so much attention that someone even asked Sir Mix-A-Lot to weigh in. What do you think Sir Mix-A-Lot had to say about a girl being proud of her ass? He spoke with The Hollywood Reporter and shut it all down:

I checked it out, and looked at it and I was kind of … I liked it. You know, I like stuff like that, but I was a little surprised at the criticism.

I can perfectly picture Sir Mix-A-Lot pulling up Blake Lively’s butt pic on his phone and nodding. Like perhaps we all should have. Hmm. Nice butt. Let’s move on. He also says everyone’s going overboard with calling it appropriation.

[The] reason I wrote the song was because I always felt that the African-American idea of what was beautiful was shunned. If you go back and look at 1990, 1991, you only saw African-American women and Hispanic women who were either a maid or a hooker. I watched a lot of Law and Order, Gimme a Break, Mama’s House and all those shows, and you saw the same thing. They were always my size: overweight, and that’s the way they wanted to see us.

Now at the same time, what was promoted as beautiful was kind of really waif-thin, borderline heroin addicts. I don’t mean that literally, I mean the look. That was kind of pushed at us, and we were told that it was beautiful, and what I started to see was some people of color either being ashamed of who they were or trying their best to assimilate. So I wrote “Baby Got Back,” not to say which race is prettier — which is silly, because there were white women with the same curves that were told that they were fat, too.

And if a white actress wants to support the standard that Mix-A-Lot pushed for, he’s down with that.

Fast-forward to Blake Lively. For her to look at her butt and that little waist and to say “L.A. face with an Oakland booty,” doesn’t that mean that the norm has changed, that the beautiful people have accepted our idea of beautiful? That’s the way I took it.

Well said, Sir Mix.