Meet Kimi Warner, A Hawaiian Chick Who Spends Her Life In A Bikini As The U.S. National Spearfishing Champion

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Meet Kimi Warner, A Hawaiian Chick Who Spends Her Life In A Bikini As The U.S. National Spearfishing Champion

Kimi Werner is a Hawaiian native who grew up on an isolated coastal section of Maui, learning to freedive by shadowing her father, an accomplished freediver who would use the ocean as a source of food for his family. After years of apprenticing under her freediving father Kimi Werner went on to become the United States National Spearfishing Champion. Due to her strengths as a freediver she is able to stay underneath the water for incredibly long periods of time, and get down to depths most people cannot reach. This enables her to shoot the trophy fish that are out of reach for most spearfisherman. In addition to being a total badass spearfisherman she also has the added benefit of getting to live her entire life wearing a bikini and/or wetsuit, so Kimi Werner’s racked up a formidable following of 90k+ followers (we at CoreBoobs only have 69k followers on Instagram, let’s change that ). In the past I’ve noticed MASSIVE upticks in the number of followers these girls on Instagram with fishing-related accounts get after we post them, and I’m guessing that we’re going to see a huge rise in Kimi Werner’s Instagram following today after you bros see pics of the most badass female spearfisherman in America!

Everybody needs a little assistance. This photo by @perrinjames1 was taken a few months ago when I was showing young @eezraw the ropes to bluewater diving. Immediately after that trip, I realized how much I was in need of some assistance of my own. I thought back to a bright and ambitious girl named Sarah @swil012 , whom I had met just once before and whether it was impulse (or instinct!), I ended up hiring her to come to Hawaii and be my right hand woman. We spent the last few months growing ideas, working with others and basically getting s#%+ done! Sarah did everything: emails, phone calls, attended meetings with me (and often in place of me), kept my phone charged and even drove from the North Shore to Makaha and back when I accidentally left my purse there. She also had the ability to drop everything to simply give me a hug when she knew I was having a hard day. There were days when she’d come to work and I’d tell her “Today you are hired to be my boss. Tell me what to do! Should I work? Or should we surf? Do you want to dive? You need to decide today, Boss!!” And she’d look at me like I was crazy but then immediately come up with a plan and carry on. Today was her last day as she is flying out tonight to finish her last year at Vanderbilt University. It’s crazy how attached I’ve become to our daily routines that were never very routine at all. It takes a certain kind of person to be able to stick with my flow and she not only did that with grace, but she genuinely improved the quality of my life with all of her brilliant capabilities and her beautiful friendship alone. Thank you @swil012, you are loved and will be missed. But I know you’ll be back for more. ???

A photo posted by Kimi Werner (@kimi_swimmy) on

Everybody needs a little assistance. This photo by @perrinjames1 was taken a few months ago when I was showing young @eezraw the ropes to bluewater diving. Immediately after that trip, I realized how much I was in need of some assistance of my own. I thought back to a bright and ambitious girl named Sarah @swil012 , whom I had met just once before and whether it was impulse (or instinct!), I ended up hiring her to come to Hawaii and be my right hand woman. We spent the last few months growing ideas, working with others and basically getting s#%+ done! Sarah did everything: emails, phone calls, attended meetings with me (and often in place of me), kept my phone charged and even drove from the North Shore to Makaha and back when I accidentally left my purse there. She also had the ability to drop everything to simply give me a hug when she knew I was having a hard day. There were days when she’d come to work and I’d tell her “Today you are hired to be my boss. Tell me what to do! Should I work? Or should we surf? Do you want to dive? You need to decide today, Boss!!” And she’d look at me like I was crazy but then immediately come up with a plan and carry on. Today was her last day as she is flying out tonight to finish her last year at Vanderbilt University. It’s crazy how attached I’ve become to our daily routines that were never very routine at all. It takes a certain kind of person to be able to stick with my flow and she not only did that with grace, but she genuinely improved the quality of my life with all of her brilliant capabilities and her beautiful friendship alone. Thank you @swil012, you are loved and will be missed. But I know you’ll be back for more. ???

A photo posted by Kimi Werner (@kimi_swimmy) on

Home for the holidays!!! Yippee!!! Photo by @christykkw

A photo posted by Kimi Werner (@kimi_swimmy) on

Teaming up with @donkeyshow to get dinner. @riffe_international #ono #wahoo #wildfoods photo by @djstruntzphoto

A photo posted by Kimi Werner (@kimi_swimmy) on

After my last post many people wrote in to ask, “what is shallow water blackout?” Shallow water blackout is more dangerous than sharks, currents or any other risk while freediving. Simply put, it’s passing out underwater and just like fainting on land, it happens when the brain does not get a sufficient amount of oxygen. The lights go out and the diver is left unconscious. The reason it’s called “shallow” water black out even though it’s often the result of diving somewhat deep, is because the actual fainting often occurs as the diver is ascending and approaching the surface. Divers often blackout near the surface because as you reach those shallower depths, your compressed lungs naturally start to expand back to their normal size. As they do, they suck oxygen back into them. If you are already oxygen deprived from holding your breath, your lungs might suck the last of the oxygen from your brain, causing the blackout. Anyone who has fainted on land knows that after you faint, oxygen usually rushes back to your brain and your brain then tells your body to start breathing again. Once this happens, you wake up and are usually fine. However when you experience #swb , our wet skin tells our brain that we are underwater so it doesn’t breathe again and the unconscious diver continues to hold their breath, often in a state of euphoria, until too much damage is done to the brain and they die. Even if the brain decides to do an emergency inhale (sometimes referred to as a terminal gasp), it obviously does no good to someone underwater. However, if the diver has a partner spotting him/her this can all be reversed immediately by bringing the unconscious diver to air, removing their mask and snorkel, blowing on their face (to let their brains know they can breathe again) and by talking to the diver to wake them up. When these actions are taken immediately, cpr and mouth to mouth aren’t even necessary and the diver usually wakes up from their euphoric dream unharmed. This is why it is so important to have a dive partner at anytime when you are holding your breath in the water. I hope this helps explain #shallowwaterblackout . Please dive safe. Photo: @cinematowski

A photo posted by Kimi Werner (@kimi_swimmy) on

Hope you had a lovely day! Thanks for the smiles @freddybooth

A video posted by Kimi Werner (@kimi_swimmy) on

Well bros, that about wraps up the coverage of Kimi Werner’s Instagram for today. If you saw anything you liked then I suggest hitting that follow button, and I guarantee you won’t be disappointed. And for more Kimi Werner content you can check out video and updates over on her official website !